saying numbers - ProTeacher Community


PCM
Guest
 
 

PCM
Guest
 
 
saying numbers
Old 10-12-2005, 10:26 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #1

a dumb question ~ is it REALLY wrong to say a number like 876 as Eight Hundred AND Seventy Six??


  Reply With Quote


phoebe611's Avatar
phoebe611 phoebe611 is offline
Senior Member
 
Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 643

phoebe611
Senior Member
 
phoebe611's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 643
saying numbers
Old 10-12-2005, 01:38 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #2

I teach my students to NOT say "and" unless they are saying a decimal number with it. For example 867.7 would be eight hundred sixty-seven AND seven tenths. Since you are not saying tenths, hundredths, etc. then I don't really think it matters. Plus, you are the adult - say what you want!
phoebe611 is offline   Reply With Quote
Tylana Tylana is offline
Full Member
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Posts: 327

Tylana
Full Member
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Posts: 327
Prefer
Old 10-13-2005, 08:50 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #3

I prefer that the children do not include the and unless there is a decimal point. Is it really wrong? I think it is because as teachers we should model correct grammar, etc.

This is just my opinion though!
Tylana is offline   Reply With Quote
5th
Guest
 
 

5th
Guest
 
 
yes, it's incorrect
Old 10-15-2005, 02:48 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #4

my students and I refer to it as the "whole number swear word" and we all exaggerate a gasp if we hear anybody use it
  Reply With Quote
TexTeacher's Avatar
TexTeacher TexTeacher is offline
Senior Member
 
Joined: Aug 2005
Posts: 1,865

TexTeacher
Senior Member
 
TexTeacher's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2005
Posts: 1,865

Old 10-15-2005, 07:01 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #5

"and" means there is a decimal point. ex. five dollars and thirty nine cents.


TexTeacher is offline   Reply With Quote
MM
Guest
 
 

MM
Guest
 
 
And
Old 10-16-2005, 09:36 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #6

Yes, it is really wrong to say AND unless there is a decimal point. If my students say AND I point it out until they stop and I tell them that I am only trying to make it easier for them when we get to decimals. They usually catch each other doing it and correct their classmates instead of me having to do it though.
  Reply With Quote
hescollin hescollin is offline
Senior Member
 
Joined: Aug 2005
Posts: 1,455

hescollin
Senior Member
 
Joined: Aug 2005
Posts: 1,455

Old 10-23-2005, 03:05 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #7

I agree and means a decimal point. If they say and otherwise it is confussing.
hescollin is offline   Reply With Quote
Mandi
Guest
 
 

Mandi
Guest
 
 
and....
Old 10-27-2005, 12:47 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #8

You also shouldn't be using and, because it is used when talking about mixed numbers. Example 3 1/2 is three and one-half. Kind of the same thing as the decimal.
  Reply With Quote
Mrs.Carlson
Guest
 
 

Mrs.Carlson
Guest
 
 
Wrong
Old 11-04-2005, 05:47 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #9

My class evertime someone says and in math they say you just said the a word unless your using decimals
  Reply With Quote
V dog
Guest
 
 

V dog
Guest
 
 
Hi This Is Wrong
Old 11-04-2005, 05:48 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #10

Its Rong To Say And Unless Your Using Decimals
  Reply With Quote
fried tofu
Guest
 
 

fried tofu
Guest
 
 

Old 11-16-2005, 06:20 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #11

It's not wrong. I'm pretty sure they say 876 as "eight hundred and seventy six" in British English.
  Reply With Quote
USMathProf
Guest
 
 

USMathProf
Guest
 
 
Right way of saying numbers over 100
Old 07-13-2006, 10:22 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #12

It is not right to say 876 as eight hundred seventy six, it is just lazy way of saying it. This is how it goes... if you have to say 876.56, the right way of saying it ( in the rest of the world and proper english) is eight hundred and seventy six point five six ( notice that in math you don't say fifty six after decimal point). And coming to fractions, for other than fractions like 1/2 ( half) ,quarter (1/4)
but if you have to say 876 11/5 you are supposed to say eight hundred and seventy six and eleven by five.
Seeing all the comments from TEACHERS here, I am not surprised as to why our American kids are way far behind in math skills than rest of the world.
  Reply With Quote
SusanTeach's Avatar
SusanTeach SusanTeach is offline
Senior Member
 
Joined: Oct 2001
Posts: 12,107

SusanTeach
Senior Member
 
SusanTeach's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2001
Posts: 12,107
wrong
Old 07-13-2006, 10:33 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #13

Sorry to disagree with "USMathProf" and "friedtofu", but that's incorrect. I agree with the other posters - you only use the words "and" when it's a decimal or fraction to show a division from whole to part.
SusanTeach is offline   Reply With Quote
teachva's Avatar
teachva teachva is offline
Full Member
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Posts: 100

teachva
Full Member
 
teachva's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Posts: 100
and...
Old 07-13-2006, 10:45 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #14

I did some research, and it looks like there is still some controversy on this topic. See the link below for more info:

http://mathforum.org/library/drmath/view/57225.html

The truth for most of us though is that for the tests our kids have to take they need to learn to use the "and" to show the decimal point. Reguardless of your feelings on testing, this is the society we live in. With NCLB and pressure to keep my test scores up, I will continue to correct my students and tell them that the "and" should only appear in numbers with decimals.
teachva is offline   Reply With Quote
westlynn27
Guest
 
 

westlynn27
Guest
 
 
a Canadian point of view
Old 11-09-2006, 01:33 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #15

I have always said "and" and used "point" to represent the decimal point. In spoken English, it simply sounds better to say two hundred and thirty-five point six (for 236.6).

Grammatically speaking it might make sense to drop the "and" it's simpler that way... but to be quite honest it just doesn't sound very nice when the "and" is dropped.

English is sometimes a stupid language with weird constructions...sorry.

If people who commonly use "and" are understood without any problem whatsoever then I can't see why it is wrong. To go on a quest to eradicate the "and" seems a little 1984-ish.
  Reply With Quote
elle1
Guest
 
 

elle1
Guest
 
 

Old 12-04-2006, 04:52 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #16

In British English we are taught that 876.7 would be said as eight hundred and seventy six point 7 whereas 876 7/10 would be said as eight hundred and seventy six and seven tenths. Where is the difference in American English between decimal places and fractions?

In the UK children manage to grasp the difference between 'and' used internally as part of a number and 'and' used to separate the whole number from the part- it really is not a difficult concept.

Also on the point that teachers should model correct grammar- I think 'and' as used in numbers is the least of the worries of the American education system when it comes to grammar! Eg. Mrs Carlson's lack of sentence structure on this very page and V dog's spelling and capitalisation.
  Reply With Quote
Proper
Guest
 
 

Proper
Guest
 
 
Proper english
Old 07-28-2008, 09:52 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #17

Okay why do broadcasters all over the world exclude the word and from a number. So I guess what you are saying is that they are wrong also. So tell me what is proper english anyway? Language is part of a culture. So please enlighten me as to why most of the world cannot understand most of the people who speak so called proper english?
  Reply With Quote
gwill
Guest
 
 

gwill
Guest
 
 
wrong
Old 08-19-2008, 01:19 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #18

How about we say and after all number places. For example, the number 1,256,362 as one million and two hundred and fifty and 6 thousand and three hundred and sixty and two. This sounds ridiculous, but I think it makes a good point. Why say and just after saying hundred. I am also a teacher. I teach chemisty and physics. Think about what year it is. Is it two thousand and eight or two thousand eight? There is no doubt AND is used to imply a fraction/decimal ONLY!
  Reply With Quote
Diane Spence
Guest
 
 

Diane Spence
Guest
 
 
Teacher
Old 12-01-2008, 06:53 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #19

When the year was 1997, we did not say nineteen hundred and ninety-seven. We said nineteen ninety-seven. So why would we now say two thousand and eight for 2008? Just say two thousand eight!

Also you do not say seventy and five for 75. You merely say seventy-five. So why say one hundred and fifty? Merely say one hundred fifty.

Let's leave the "and" for decimals where it belongs
  Reply With Quote
Graham Crewe
Guest
 
 

Graham Crewe
Guest
 
 
British English numbers
Old 03-09-2009, 06:56 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #20

In the UK we say 'and' after the word 'hundred'. To say that the word 'and' is a 'whole number swear word' is a joke (5th). Do American teachers think that British English teachers tell kids that 'color' is for losers? Of course not. We point out that it is acceptable spelling in the US, but in most of the rest of the English speaking world we write 'colour'.
So in British English we would say:
450,000.25 = four hundred and fifty thousand point two five
400,360.06 = four hundred thousand, three hundred and sixty point oh (or zero) six
  Reply With Quote
Rhodes
Guest
 
 

Rhodes
Guest
 
 
Perception
Old 09-05-2009, 07:55 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #21

Honestly, this is a debate that is on par with discussions concerning religion. I think that the usage of the word "and" is akin to the usage of "hopefully"... American English has created its own concept of the meaning. I am quite confident that it does not mean decimal in all cases, as that would imply that all numbers without a fraction or decimal cannot include the word "and".
  Reply With Quote
stefanool
Guest
 
 

stefanool
Guest
 
 
Saying number
Old 04-18-2011, 01:59 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #22

Why in the first writing number you donīt separate with comma and in the second yes??'


450,000.25 = four hundred and fifty thousand point two five
400,360.06 = four hundred thousand, three hundred and sixty point oh (or zero) six


There is a rule?
  Reply With Quote
imnotamentor
Guest
 
 

imnotamentor
Guest
 
 
it's not wrong because..
Old 11-25-2011, 02:35 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #23

Hello friends,

I think that is it not wrong to say 876 as eight hundred and seventy six.

The reason why I think this way, is because the world oldest book (at least known to many nations) the Bible has the numbers with an "and".

For example, "Genesis 7:24 - The waters flooded the earth for a hundred and fifty days."

If we follow to the new rules, suggested by the teachers, then it would mean that the waters flooded the earth for a 100.5 (one hundred and a half day.)

Therefore I think that it is still correct to say eight hundred and seventy six until the Bible is revised.

Cheers,
Jake
  Reply With Quote
JamesNanshan
Guest
 
 

JamesNanshan
Guest
 
 
And means addition
Old 09-06-2012, 06:05 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #24

Hey Everybody,

I am American, but I must agree with the British: "and" should be included. The reason is simple: "and" means addition, not a decimal point. How many books do we have when we add two books and 4 books? We use "and" to represent to plus. So, one hundred and forty-two is just one hundred plus forty-two (142).
  Reply With Quote
Grammarboff
Guest
 
 

Grammarboff
Guest
 
 
Grammarboff
Old 06-03-2013, 07:58 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #25

This is actually a case where many teachers teach incorrectly. In fact, it is incorrect to leave out the "and" between hundreds and tens. The "rule" of leaving it out was fabricated to help students understand whole numbers and fractions. But what makes more understandable mathematics is bad English, which has sadly found its way into many rule books and teachers' manuals.
Contrary to what many people think:
"eight hundred seventy six" is incorrect;
"eight hundred and seventy six" is correct.
Thousands are separated by a comma: "one thousand, eight hundred and seventy six".
If there is a fraction, yes, horror of horrors, there is more than one "and". The "and" before the fraction is separated by a comma in writing:
"One hundred and seventy two thousand, five hundred and twenty six, and three fifths".
The term "eight hundred seventy six" is literally closer to meaning "eight hundred TIMES seventy six".
This is standard English, not British vs. American. Soon, I hope, the rule books will be corrected.
  Reply With Quote
Grammarboff
Guest
 
 

Grammarboff
Guest
 
 
What a Shame
Old 06-03-2013, 08:28 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #26

It is a great shame that teachers such as SusanTeach and gwill are imposing false rules on their students. When the teachers do not know what they are teaching, what hope is there? What worse can a teacher do than to "correct" a student who does something correctly into doing it wrongly?!
  Reply With Quote

Join the conversation! Post as a guest or become a member today. New members welcome!

Reply

 

>
Math & Science
Thread Tools



Sign Up FREE | ProTeacher Help | BusyBoard

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 01:44 AM.


Copyright © 2014 ProTeacher®
For individual use only. Do not copy, reproduce or transmit.
source: www.proteacher.net