Best way to teach alphabet recognition? - ProTeacher Community


Home Join Now Search My Favorites
Help


      ARCHIVE


Best way to teach alphabet recognition?

>

Reply
 
Thread Tools
vic vic is offline
 
Joined: Dec 2005
Posts: 651
Senior Member

vic
 
Joined: Dec 2005
Posts: 651
Senior Member
Best way to teach alphabet recognition?
Old 06-01-2006, 01:07 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #1

In the fall, I will be teaching in a 4K classroom. I know that I will need to teach letter and sound recognition and would like some suggestions as to how others have taught the letters to 4 year olds and the sequence. I know that their are several ways-like just alphabet in order, letter of the week or the sequence(don't know specific name) that teaches in certain order to help with word spelling later. Just looking for some suggestions as to which techniques have worked best for others. thanks


vic is offline   Reply With Quote


kali's Avatar
kali kali is offline
 
Joined: Mar 2006
Posts: 1,659
Senior Member

kali
 
kali's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2006
Posts: 1,659
Senior Member
Hi Vic
Old 06-05-2006, 05:32 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #2

I would start by teaching your students the letters in their own name.

i teach Kindergarten and we use a program called Handwriting without Tears. They have a pre-k catalog that looks really cute. You might want to check it out. HWT gives a great order to teach the letters and explains why it makes so much sense. HWT us just great all around, I really LOVE it. If you ordered a catalog or checked their web site, you could explore if it was an option for you. Good luck!
kali is offline   Reply With Quote
Anon
 
 
Guest

Anon
 
 
Guest
Alpahbet Recognition
Old 07-18-2006, 01:18 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #3

I taught 4 year olds for a brief time but I used to teach the 3 year olds. What I did to help them learn their letters was to buy the alphabet cards (the kind you hang on the wall with all the letters and pictures on them). Then we would recite this simple chant. For example, the letter A had a picture of an apple on it, so my class would changt A A apple. B was bus so it was B B Bus and so. That helped them learn the picture and the letter. Also, I cut out all the alphabet letters on sand paper and would have the kids trace the letter with their fingers.

For the 4 year olds, I would take my cards and have them also chant this rhyme with my cards to teach sounds of the letters. A was Apple Apple (ah ah ah). B was Bus Bus (buh buh buh). I can tell you that it worked because the 4 year olds would go home and chant it at home or whenever they recongized a letter they would tell their parent what sound the letter made.

What also helped was that I printed out the letters of the alphabet in outline form in various fonts and had them color the inside. This helped them recognize how the letter looked in the various font styles.

Hope this helps. Any other questions, feel free to ask.
  Reply With Quote
Mar Mar is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 44
Junior Member

Mar
 
Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 44
Junior Member
Other resources
Old 09-13-2006, 06:34 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #4

DVD's: Nick Jr's Alphabet Power, Leap Frog Letter Factory & other Leap Frog DVD's are good too.

Rock N Learn Alphabet on VHS.

Books: Chicka, Chicka, Sticka, Sticka by Lois Elhert by Scholastic Inc., Thomas's ABC Book at Randomhouse.com/kids
Mar is offline   Reply With Quote
bulldogs
 
 
Guest

bulldogs
 
 
Guest
ok
Old 09-03-2007, 05:48 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #5

Hi,
Just please be careful when you're teaching the sounds, because the letter "Bb" does NOT say, "buh." Us Kindergarten and 1st grade teachers really have a hard time RETEACHING the children, because they are so used to saying the "buh" sound, when in fact, the letter "Bb" says, "b", without the "uh" sound. It's the same with every other letter (except the vowels)- "Rr" says, "rrrrr", not "ruh" and so on... When they get to first grade, they will begin to write "buh" when they only have to write a "b." It's too much annunciation the way you are teaching them. Please be careful. Thanks for reading and have a great school year!


  Reply With Quote
JohnsonCB
 
 
Guest

JohnsonCB
 
 
Guest
Thank You!
Old 08-28-2008, 06:52 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #6

Thank you for specifying the importance of teaching correct sounds to students. I am a preschool teacher who just started at a new school where the teachers are teaching "Bah" "Kah" in stead of "b" and "K." Not only is it horribly annoying, but I am already seeing students struggle making the transition between saying the individual sounds and combining them into words. It is so important to teach this correctly!
  Reply With Quote
want2teach want2teach is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 23
New Member

want2teach
 
Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 23
New Member
Letter recognition and Letter Sounds
Old 09-13-2008, 03:46 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #7

Hi Everyone:
I am teaching Title 1 to Kindergartners this year which is new for me. I was hoping for ideas, suggestions, games, books, or cds that relate to teaching letter sounds and letter recognition. On Monday and Tuesday one classroom teacher would like me to teach letters, sounds and numbers to 20. I really appreciate any help!
want2teach is offline   Reply With Quote
rainbow fish rainbow fish is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Posts: 99
Full Member

rainbow fish
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Posts: 99
Full Member
Letter Game
Old 09-13-2008, 05:26 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #8

One game we play is "Charlie spys" (Charlie is the class teddy bear). One kid thinks of something in the room that starts w/ the letter we are working on. Then all of the kids take turns guessing (I give hints if it is taking a long time). The person who guesses it gets to hold Charlie and do the next one. During this if a child guesses something that starts with a different letter, I tell them and remind them of the letter sound (B says b, b, b) and have them try again.
rainbow fish is offline   Reply With Quote
Mrs. T.'s Avatar
Mrs. T. Mrs. T. is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 939
Senior Member

Mrs. T.
 
Mrs. T.'s Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 939
Senior Member

Old 09-13-2008, 06:05 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #9

I do a letter chant with my students...they all pick up the sounds very easily that way. For example..."M says mmmm" we slap our legs on M, clap our hands on "says" and then rub our tummies on "mmm". We do this for each letter...I made these up myself, so I don't have them written anywhere. Some other examples:
B- we pretend we are bouncing a ball
S- we form an s with our finger
etc.
Mrs. T. is offline   Reply With Quote
kattlyn kattlyn is offline
 
Joined: Jun 2008
Posts: 584
Senior Member

kattlyn
 
Joined: Jun 2008
Posts: 584
Senior Member
letter sounds/#s
Old 09-13-2008, 09:40 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #10

Dr Jean has some great cds for this - on Sing to Learn she has a song called Alphardy - kids love it - we act out the sounds of letters - a for apple, b for bounce - g - gallop, etc. Jack Hartmann also has some on a few of his cds - check out their websites!
#s:
I recently went to preschoolexpress.com and made copies of templates for # recognition - on fish i put 1-20 dots from a clipart book i have and then on the cat i put the # - they have to count the # of dots on fish and find the cat that matches - i was surprised to find that they actually enjoyed this - some things are hit and miss - but i've been using lots of file folder games but instead of in a folder just use them at the table and hand out 'game cards' - the one with the most wins.
i've also played a game we call 'jellyfish' - its like hearts, but with SpongeBob cards - instead of hearts,clubs, diam., spades, there are jellyfish, sea flowers, spatulas, and crabby patties - we pass out the whole deck among 3-4 players and we keep our cards face up (lots don't know their #s, then we start w/2 of sea flowers and whoever puts down the Ace (Spongebob) gets to put down his lowest of whatever he has most of. kids love it!!
kattlyn is offline   Reply With Quote
KrisK KrisK is offline
 
Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 29
New Member

KrisK
 
Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 29
New Member

Old 09-13-2008, 05:52 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #11

I use a chant called The Alphabet Jive. It goes through the alphabet letter by letter and associates each sound with an action. My kids love it!

Example:
A says a, a says a, alligator, alligator, a, a, a. (students stretch their arms out and make alligator mouths)
KrisK is offline   Reply With Quote
funkid's Avatar
funkid funkid is offline
 
Joined: Jun 2008
Posts: 1,285
Senior Member

funkid
 
funkid's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2008
Posts: 1,285
Senior Member
Look into Phonics Dance
Old 09-14-2008, 08:24 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #12

An Ohio teacher has developed a phonics program called Phonics Dance.
Her name is Ginny Dowd. My book is at school, but I am sure your could find information by "Google". I use the kindergarten letter sound chant and pictures starting at the beginning of the year. It has been very successful. The children learn letter sounds more readily than any other method that I have used.
funkid is offline   Reply With Quote
Stephanieo1
 
 
Guest

Stephanieo1
 
 
Guest
Impressions
Old 11-21-2008, 01:06 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #13

The Master teacher I worked with while doing my student teaching use to tell me the same thing and it is so true. I can see a difference by the end of the year with children who come to us from other programs. I'm supervising a group of Pre K teachers and we are in a debate as to the best order in which to teach the alphabet. We are working on a letter a week, submerging the children in everything that makes the sound of that letter and making it fun and interesting for the children too. Some want to go straight through in order of the alphabet others want to skip around, putting off vowels for some and others tailoring the alphabet to go with certain times of the year like "V" at Valentines day. What are your thoughts?
  Reply With Quote
geny
 
 
Guest

geny
 
 
Guest
Working with different levels
Old 12-29-2011, 07:17 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #14

It is okay to skip around learning the alphabet. I have some student that only knows some letters. I give them those letters to work with, just to build their confidence for other letters they think are more challenging. I have 3-5k students that are reading 1st grade level and others that don't recognize the letter in their name. It is difficult for me to work with the two extremes and not make them feel excluded or left out of anything. Do I teach at the lower level or both? Do I always divide them up? Do I partner them so the higher learner helps the lowers? Any suggestions?
  Reply With Quote

Join the conversation! Post as a guest or become a member today. New members welcome!

Reply

 

>
ARCHIVE
Thread Tools



Sign Up FREE | ProTeacher Help | BusyBoard

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 05:46 AM.


Copyright © 2014 ProTeacher®
For individual use only. Do not copy, reproduce or transmit.
source: www.proteacher.net